Spelling for the Grammar Student: Day 19 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. Oh, spelling.  How I loath thee.  Lucky me, Alex is terrible at it, too.  I have to say that this is also one area where The Well-Trained Mind has kind of let me down.  Bauer suggests the MCP Spelling Workout series, which I have never used.  Mostly because she says things like this,     “As the student progresses through these books, he’ll learn rules of spelling (‘The sound /oi/ can be spelled oy or oi, as in toy and oil’)”     Here is … Keep reading…

More Writing for the Grammar Student: Day 18 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. Yesterday, I posted about how to help your classical grammar student practice handwriting without having to copy letters and words in endless rows every day of the week.  The idea is to practice handwriting in the context of other learning once your student has progressed past the stage of learning letter formation.    Another way for your child to practice handwriting is to get them really writing.  You can begin by expanding the amount he does for notebooking, but you can also begin to teach … Keep reading…

Writing for the Grammar Student: Day 17 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. I am going to spend two days discussing writing, so let’s start with handwriting.  Just because your child has made it to first grade doesn’t mean that he will have perfect penmanship.  Alex is my struggling hand writer and just today he made a P and a 9 backwards. He does recognize it immediately, but it is so hard for him to get this into his muscle memory.  I really wish I would have started with cursive instead.  Now, since your child has probably learned … Keep reading…

More Reading for the Grammar Student: Day 16 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. Yesterday, I talked about literature and reading aloud for your grammar student.  Now I would like to talk about two other major reading endeavors that your classical student should have in the grammar stage. Informational ReadingThis is reading to learn!  Finally after all the phonics, and sight words, and readers, your child is ready to gather information from what they read.  Choose books that are at or just below their reading level to give them the most success.  These books should be part of your … Keep reading…

Reading for the Grammar Student: Day 15 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. Wow!  I’ve made it halfway through this series.  I am very excited to prove that I can blog every day if I just make the effort to find time.  I haven’t even been neglecting my children much due to blogging time. Alright, grammar stage.  First, let me share with you the two classical education resources that I primarily use.  One is The Well-Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home (Third Edition).  This text presents the trivium beginning the grammar stage with first grade.  … Keep reading…

Kindergarten Artists: Day 14 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. The final part of a well-rounded, classical Kindergarten education is the arts.  If you look at a program like Mother of Divine Grace, you will see that even in Kindergarten, they begin fine art appreciation with the study of famous paintings and traditional Catholic hymns.  That sounds great, but I really don’t do much for the arts at this age.  Part of that is because I want to wait to roll it into the 4-year history cycle, and part is because I just don’t have … Keep reading…

Kindergarten Explorers: Day 13 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. Exploring history and science should be a fun time for your Kindergartener.  Instead of focusing too much on building skills and vocabulary, you should be building your child’s interest in discovery and investigation.  My goals for this stage and these subjects is really for me to learn what interests my student.  Does he like animals, space, buildings, maps, experiments, etc.?  So really, it is a time of discovery for both parent and child.  And if you just don’t have the time, then skip it.  Keep … Keep reading…

Kindergarten Counters: Day 12 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. Preparing your Kindergartener for elementary mathematics is actually a lot of fun.  That is because almost everything they need to know can be accomplished by baking cookies with Mom.  Everyone loves cookies, right? The FoundationIf you have been working with your preschooler on counting and one-to-one correspondence, then they are well prepared for Kindergarten math.  If not, then start counting stuff.  It won’t take long to stick. The ConceptsOnce your child can count objects to at least ten, you can begin work on understanding the … Keep reading…

Kindergarten Authors: Day 11 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. For most of this series, I have cautioned against teaching handwriting too early.  It takes many children a long while to develop the fine muscle control necessary to have success at making letters with a pencil and paper.  And you aren’t going to have an easy time trying to force a physical skill onto a child that has just not reached that level yet.  However, by the time your child is four or five years of age, they might be ready for handwriting instruction.  Along … Keep reading…