Science for the Grammar Student: Day 24 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. I LOVE SCIENCE!  In fact, if life had taken a different turn, I could very well be working in a laboratory right now instead of writing this blog.  Oh, well.  God has other plans for me right now and part of that plan includes passing my love of science to my boys.  I wish we could just do science all day, but all that reading and writing and babies keep getting in the way. Science from a classical perspective is slightly different than what you … Keep reading…

More Religion for the Grammar Student: Day 23 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. Yesterday’s post on religion dealt with the more intellectual and academic nature of the subject.  But today I want to talk about a more important way to teach your children about Christ.  That is through our example.  And as we all know, what we say and do when we think our children aren’t looking is what they are going to imitate – no matter how many times you read to them from the catechism.  Let me first say that I am awful at carrying through … Keep reading…

Religion for the Grammar Student: Day 22 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. Nothing should be more important that instructing your children in your faith.  For the Catholic family, that means a lot of instruction.  We have such a wealth of information to draw upon.  It can be absolutely overwhelming.  We must always keep one thing in mind, though.    God is love.    If we can produce children that understand this, and reflect this, then we have done a good job.  All the rest is just gravy.     But gravy is so good that I think … Keep reading…

Math for the Grammar Student: Day 21 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. If you missed it a few weeks ago, now would be a good time to take a look at all your student accomplished in Kindergarten math.  Grammar stage math will build upon that knowledge as your student goes about the task of deepening his understanding of concepts and memorizing facts.  A good deal of your time will be spend improving the speed and accuracy of computations, but don’t neglect the comprehension and real life application of all those facts.     In the world of … Keep reading…

English for the Grammar Student: Day 20 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. I have very fond memories of my junior high English teacher, Mrs. Clark.  Hers was the kind of class that many students hated…and some failed.  I loved it.  And now that I am more educated on teaching methods, I see that her philosophy was very classical in nature.    Here are a few of her teaching strategies that I remember:   MemorizationIf it was a list that could be memorized, she made us do it.  Pronouns, sentence types, even prepositions!  We also had to learn … Keep reading…

Spelling for the Grammar Student: Day 19 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. Oh, spelling.  How I loath thee.  Lucky me, Alex is terrible at it, too.  I have to say that this is also one area where The Well-Trained Mind has kind of let me down.  Bauer suggests the MCP Spelling Workout series, which I have never used.  Mostly because she says things like this,     “As the student progresses through these books, he’ll learn rules of spelling (‘The sound /oi/ can be spelled oy or oi, as in toy and oil’)”     Here is … Keep reading…

More Writing for the Grammar Student: Day 18 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. Yesterday, I posted about how to help your classical grammar student practice handwriting without having to copy letters and words in endless rows every day of the week.  The idea is to practice handwriting in the context of other learning once your student has progressed past the stage of learning letter formation.    Another way for your child to practice handwriting is to get them really writing.  You can begin by expanding the amount he does for notebooking, but you can also begin to teach … Keep reading…

Writing for the Grammar Student: Day 17 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. I am going to spend two days discussing writing, so let’s start with handwriting.  Just because your child has made it to first grade doesn’t mean that he will have perfect penmanship.  Alex is my struggling hand writer and just today he made a P and a 9 backwards. He does recognize it immediately, but it is so hard for him to get this into his muscle memory.  I really wish I would have started with cursive instead.  Now, since your child has probably learned … Keep reading…

More Reading for the Grammar Student: Day 16 of 31 Days of Classical Education Lite

If you are new to this series, feel free to start at the beginning.  For each of the 31 days of October 2013, I will write about practical ways to include classical education in your school routine, whether that is preschool, homeschool, or afterschool.  I will focus on an age range of birth to fourth grade.  This includes the grammar stage of the Classical Trivium. Yesterday, I talked about literature and reading aloud for your grammar student.  Now I would like to talk about two other major reading endeavors that your classical student should have in the grammar stage. Informational ReadingThis is reading to learn!  Finally after all the phonics, and sight words, and readers, your child is ready to gather information from what they read.  Choose books that are at or just below their reading level to give them the most success.  These books should be part of your … Keep reading…